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How Collaboration Changes the Way Photographers Do Business

Aristotle was onto something. When he said that “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” he set the stage for collaborative business models. What Aristotle accurately observed was that a cohesive group working together outperforms even its best individual member.

What if photographers started working with their clients to create a more valuable result than either could create on their own?

How Collaboration Changes the Way Photographers Do Business

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What’s Inside:

A challenge to look at your photography business in a different way, to see your clients as collaborators rather than consumers. Inside you’ll also find a practical guide for taking the first steps toward a new, collaborative business model.

Take a Look:

Aristotle was onto something. When he said that “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” he set the stage for collaborative business models. What Aristotle accurately observed was that a cohesive group working together outperforms even its best individual member.

What if photographers started working with their clients to create a more valuable result than either could create on their own?

Forget the old school business model of the lone photographer in front of his computer, emailing eager clients about timelines for album delivery. Instead, visualize a lively conversation between a photographer and her client. They video chat, sharing ideas about how to curate content from the past year to design a book that memorializes milestones as significant as a teenager’s graduation and as simple as a child’s lemonade stand.

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5 Comments

  • ajay fay says:

    I agree with Jason, quality control is the issue.. Melani, and Jason got right to the truth..
    Aks anyone of the top wedding photographers, or any top commercial photographers would never agree to do it..

  • The notion of “Exclusive” photographer is an increasingly antiquated concept as members of the community are engaging in more and more visual opportunities. Just look to crowd sourcing in media outlets and news organizations for relevant communication, I phones with 8mp cameras and HD video as small as your palm. I believe it will be those that are able to quickly and efficiently organize and distribute relevant information to the largest audience that will ultimately have the greatest gain.

    To answer Rachel’s question: The value of visual content is decided by those that are the consumers of the image or video. There is still room for gatekeepers of this information as is seen in the need for professional journalists to sort out the large amounts of extra information being communicated.

    In the academic world they say that the image with the the most compelling content, lighting, composition and emotive narrative is worth exponentially more then the snap shot by “Bob.” Now I will give it to professionals that they tend to be more consistent with these ingredients as they are trained in their minds eye to see these elements quickly and to respond creatively. However unmistakably Bob can achieve these same results and exceed them from time to time. These qualities of content are not exclusive to the professional nor are they the only ingredients. I would say that capturing the spirit is something that a relative or friend may be able to achieve easier due to the fact that images are felt and understood deeply when connected to a strong familiarity with the subject.

    Collision of content: Ultimately whether we are the exclusive content creator or are sharing the space with others the best images and memories will rise to the top. Our job should be to act as ambassadors of these images and to empower people to celebrate their collective experiences in deeper and broader ways and not to try and keep people from playing which would be a losings proposition.

  • Louis Blythe says:

    Interesting ideas! I cant wait to read the PDF!

  • […] A couple weeks ago we had the pleasure of partying-it-up at PartnerCon at the Hard Rock Hotel in San Diego with a boatload of other awesome photographers. PartnerCon is a photography conference put on by the good folks over at Pictage. We’ve had the pleasure of working with Pictage on a lot of really exciting projects in the past, and we can’t wait to unveil some new projects with them in 2012. You can find one of our articles we wrote called “Branding: the buzz word that’s misunderstood” here, as well as one of their ‘Dispatches’ that we designed called “The Mashable Movement“. […]

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